General Technical

Wheels, Toronto Star, December 21, 2013

Article about one of our members, George Christie in the Wheels section of the Toronto Star, December 21 2013

Scotland Salutes Ecurie Ecosse

Insurance Changes

“The Canadian collector vehicle hobby is facing radical changes this year with the takeover of Lant Silver Wheel® and Custom Wheel® programs by American, Hagerty Insurance of Traverse City, Michigan. Hagerty’s advertising touts “no appraisals are required”, creating the impression vehicle owners will be saving money. However, current policy holders may want to carefully compare their 2012 renewal rates against other collector vehicle insurance programs as the renewal may now also include “policy issuance fees”, and other fees that did not exist under the old program and may actually result in higher premiums.


You may want to do some “comparison shopping” and consider insurance programs offered by local Canadian specialty insurance providers that can offer lower rates and definitely no extra fees.


Vintage Auto Insurance (Jason Wilson 1-800-307-7066

www.vintageautoinsurance.ca), and

Crosslands General Insurance (John Charno 1-800-461-2951)

have agreed to accept existing appraisals from Professional Association of Vehicle Evaluators members (www.trustpave.com) up to five years old enabling you to change your insurance company and not have to obtain an appraisal until a full five years have passed.


Zehr Insurance (Scott Smith 1-800-667-1802 – www.zehrvintagecars.com) will accept appraisals up to three years old.”


If you have any questions please contact Allan Lewis: allan@vintagecarconnection.com or at 1-888-319-3321

Aged Tires

Recording of a TV show featuring aged tires - a driving hazard?

   

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBMkswl8VQw

 

There also is an article "Tired Tires" under Triumph in the Technical Section.

 

Please check the age of the tires on your British vehicle by reading the Tire Identification code:

 

Since 2000, the week and year, that the tire was produced, has been provided by the last four digits of the Tire Identification Number with the two digits being used to identify the week immediately preceding the two digits used to identify the year.

 

    

  • In the above example of a tire manufactured since 2000:

DOT U2LL LMLR 5107

Manufactured during the 51st week of the year

Manufactured during 2007

 

While the entire Tire Identification Number is required to be branded onto one sidewall of every tire, current regulations also require that DOT and the first digits of the Tire Identification Number must also be branded onto the opposite sidewall.

 

Therefore, it is possible to see a Tire Identification Number that appears incomplete and requires looking at the tire's other sidewall to find the entire Tire Identification Number.

Prior to 2000 - The Tire Identification Code on a tire that was produced before 2000 was based on the idea that a tire would not be in service for more than a total of ten years.  However these days, that can be un-realistic especially with collector cars and recreational use vehicles. 

 

Yet even under that idea, manufacturers were required to provide this same information, with the week and year that the tires were manufactured within those last three digits.  In this case though two digits used to identify the particular week a tire was made immediately followed by a single digit that identified the year.

 

For example, if the Tire Identification Code on a tire reads:

 

          XXXXXXXX 057

                   05 - Manufactured during the 05th week of the year

                     7 - Manufactured during the 7th year of the decade

 

Useful Links

Here are two links that may be useful for any member working on their British vehicle.  Many thanks Eric Taylor.

 

How to use and interpret a Vacuum Gauge

 

www.secondchancegarage.com/public/186.cfm

 

Wheel and Tire size comparison

 

www.mintylamb.co.uk/?page=tyre.htm